Mentorship Matters Graduates

Wednesday January 30 2019 eight BAC 2 BCmembers completed the Train the Trainer for Mentorship Matters a program developed by Skill Plan our construction Industry Training Plan (supported by our affiliates) and Mentorship Matters. The local is doing this in an effort to increase skill level and improve the apprenticeship experience by teaching apprentices how to get the most out of their apprenticeship by asking the right questions and listening to the mentor, while also training our mentors techniques to help the apprentice learn and retain skills, paving the way to a future for our union and to ensure a trained workforce ready to take over as our members retire.

Mentorship Matters

BAC Local 2 BC and the Trowel Trades Training Association are taking part in the Mentorship Matters Project. The Local is seeking experienced and willing journeypersons to attend the train the trainer program for the Mentorship program January 30 2019. These members would take a one day train the trainer course and would then teach the half day courses for mentors and mentees. The future of our trade depends on better on the job training and mentorship. Contact Geoff Higginson at 778-847-2472 or the office at 604-584-2021. Mentorship Matters Program.

Job Stewards

Job Stewards require a good balance of experience in the trade and knowledge of the most current collective agreement.  This pocket reference gives the basic rules but is no replacement for experience and training.  Job stewards are officially assigned/appointed by the union.

 

Forklift Training This Week. Out of Work?

This week Thursday November 1 and Friday November 2 is counter balance and rough terrain forklift training.  Each ticket each day.  Come for two days and get both.  They are Ives Certifications.  Phone the office now.  1-855-584-2021.

BC Building Trades Statement on LNG Project

STATEMENT FROM BC BUILDING TRADES EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR TOM SIGURDSON

The BC Building Trades welcomes LNG Canada’s final investment decision on the $40 billion liquefied natural gas project in Kitimat, B.C., and congratulates the NDP provincial government on ushering in the single largest private sector investment in Canada.

This project is a boon for the sector, and will provide thousands of construction jobs when it gets under way.

We represent 40,000 highly skilled unionized construction workers and are part of a network of 400,000 members across Canada. We are committed, prepared and eager to work on this project.

The BC Building Trades was appointed to the Premier’s LNG Working Group in 2013 and has been doubling down on our efforts to ensure our province has the skilled workers the industry requires, and that British Columbians have the skills to be first in line for the jobs on LNG projects. This investment signals a commitment to local workers and apprentices.

Some of the ways our members have prepared for LNG:

  • Heat and Frost Insulators: expertise in cryogenic insulation application
  • Bricklayers: expanded industrial certification training; using infrastructure fund to train members in gunite, hydro mobile scaffold, forklifts and other elevated work platforms
  • International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers: prioritizing training in automation and control of local infrastructure in preparation for workforce demand created by LNG
  • Sheet Metal Workers: working with the Sheet Metal Workers Training Centre to deliver lagging training (lagging is the protective covering over insulation)
  • UA Piping Industry College: training workers for low transformation temperature welding
  • Other: we have recruitment strategies targeting Indigenous populations, women, veterans and other underrepresented groups

In addition, we have more than $50 million in assets across our many union training programs. This includes land, facilities and equipment.

We enroll more than 7,000 apprentices and trainees and spend more than $18 million annually on training and apprenticeship programs.

We recognize that LNG industry will require workers who are uniquely skilled and may not be available in B.C. or the rest of Canada, justifying the hiring of temporary foreign workers. We expect that these workers can help train B.C. workers while they are here so that we can ultimately fill that skills gap.

Tom Sigurdson

Executive director,

BC Building Trades